Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Spider Scarf Done! (Well, Almost...)

I've all but finished the spider scarf (pattern: October is for Spinners).  Alright, I admit it: it's still on the needles, because I haven't bound off, yet.  That of course means that it also still needs blocking, but given that there's no way it'll be cool enough to wear it in the next few weeks, motivation is nil.

To do the last several rows, I needed size 13 needles, but they were still stuck in a WIP-- a Wham Bam Thank You Lamb cowl I was reworking.  That prompted me to go ahead and finish knitting that, too, so there's another project off the list.  (Except the reworked cowl wasn't technically on my WIP list...)

The spider scarf was an interesting pattern.  Definitely one to keep you on your toes.  I'm still not sure when I'll ever wear it, but it was fun to make.

Here it is in its bowl (along with the leftover yarn).  The pink yarn is some scrap kitchen cotton that I used for a lifeline before switching up needle sizes.  I don't use lifelines often enough.  When craft-disaster strikes, they can save hours of work (and your sanity), but I'm just too lazy to stop and do them.  ...No, no, that's not it.  I'm too excited to stop?  I'm too optimistic to believe that anything could go wrong enough that I'd ever need a lifeline?  Must be one or both of those.

Awaiting Final Touches

That's the "Wham Bam" cowl in front of the scarf.
I still need to weave in the ends and seam it.  (Procrastination Mode: Activated!)

Bulky Garter Stitch

Since finishing the scarf, I've been working on the hexagon afghan (formally titled the "Earth, Sea, and Stone 'Ghan").  It's a slow progress project.  Crochet a row or two of hexagons, then stop to weave in the ends.  Repeat until boredom drives you to find/start another project to work on instead.

Ok, that's a bit too negative.
It's an okay project, in small doses.  Part of the problem is that I just don't really like the yarn I'm using-- Caron Simply Soft.  (And that explains why I started this afghan to begin with: it was-- and still is-- intended to use up my remaining stash of that yarn!)  Also, it feels like you don't get much crochet time before it's time to stop and weave in the ends, again.  And while I like JAYGo well enough (especially the fact that it eliminates the need to sew or crochet pieces together at the end of the project), every third round of this project is JAYGo.  It's a lot of JAYGo is what I'm saying, and I have my limits.  (g)

...Then the weather (which had turned delightfully cool and autumnal for a few days) became warmer, and it was suddenly no longer pleasant to have an afghan-in-progress on my lap, so I brought out yet another hibernating WIP.  (Whittling away at the stack...)  I had done about eight rounds before putting it away, way back in 2013, so it was only barely begun.

The pattern is Patricia Kristoffersen's "Bewitching" (from the booklet Doilies with Charm).  It's my first doily (I think...) in thread thinner than size 10.  Size 20 Cébélia in "Sea Mist Blue".  I believe I'm using a larger hook than is typically recommended for this thread-- 1.5mm instead of 1.4mm-- but there's a certain amount of leeway available in these matters.

"Bewitching" Doily

Back when I used to lurk on a couple of doily groups, there were people using size 100 thread and talking about how they no longer liked using "bulky" size 10 and preferred the finer threads.  It's a bit mystifying-- like people who are "addicted" to running and can't stand it when something keeps them from their daily jog. ;o)

Maybe it's still too early to say, but I don't think I'm headed that way quite yet (on the fine thread or the running, unfortunately).  It's getting easier to work with the thinner thread, but I don't think it's really any more enjoyable than chunky size 10.  I do love Cébélia, though.  It's definitely a cut above most other crochet threads I've tried.

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Serious Luna (just because she posed when I had the camera out for this post's photos):

Little Luna